2b – Instructional Strategies

“Coach teachers in and model design and implementation of technology-enhanced learning experiences using a variety of research-based, learner-centered instructional strategies and assessment tools to address the diverse needs and interests of all students”– ISTE Coaching Indicator 2b

For this rather lengthy indicator, I decided to break my reflection down into two parts that connect to two different blog posts I made during my course of study in  the Digital Education Leadership program. The first reflection deals with the design and implementation of technology-enhanced learning experiences that use a variety of research-based, learner-centered instructional strategies and assessment tools while the second post deals specifically with addressing the diverse needs and interests of all students.

For the first element of the indicator related to the technology-enhanced learning experiences, I thought of my post Building a Better Education with Scaffolding!  In this post, I reflect on Dr. Liz Kolb’s “Triple E” framework and how it applies to helping teachers scaffold the implementation technology in their classrooms by encouraging “engagement, enhancement, and extension” of learning goals through technology. She pairs effective questions regarding the implementation of each component with practical examples of each and how they relate to learning goals. While other models like the TPACK and SAMR models purport to do the same thing, I still believe Dr. Kolb’s model presents the most compelling case – particularly  because of its emphasis on the learning goals.

For the second part of the indicator, I want to focus on the “diverse needs and interests of all students” portion of the standard (Italics added for emphasis).  I looked at student accessibility in my post “All Aboard!”- Accessibility Guidelines and Digital Leadership Coaching. In it, I take a broad view of the need for accessibility guidelines for technology, the law regarding ADA compliance for websites, and the role the school can play in helping students with learning disabilities.  The government provided much of the information for the post and I was genuinely surprised with the clarity and effectiveness with the government’s standards. Oddly, the initial prompt for this post related to ISTE standard 3, indicator f dealing with school infrastructure, but I hijacked it a bit to discuss the implication of the addition of the words “accessibility guidelines” to the standard.  I think it was worthwhile.  If technology is to truly be the great equalizer, then it must level the playing field for ALL participants.